Encountering God in the Liminality of Graduate School, Part 2

It was 1991, during the summer between my first and second years of medical school. I was in the basement of a Christian clinic in Times Square. The clinic provided free medical care for homeless people in New York City. I was filling up a tub with warm soapy water so one of our homeless clients could soak his feet.Read more…

Scholar’s Compass: Stories for Life

Earlier today, I wrote a letter to my major professor from my Ph.D. program thanking him for all the time and work he put into training me. I told him that any accomplishment that I or my students might achieve could be accredited to him because of his dedication to excellence. Knowing him, this statement might mean as much to him as his winning of the Nobel Peace prize in 2007.Read more…

How can Privileged Christians Work Strategically for Equality?

What privileges do we have as Christians? Whatever our situation, we have more privilege than we think we do. What makes us believe in the phenomenon that we believe that we are marginalized when we really are very privileged? How can we model after Jesus and use this privilege to advocate for, minister to, and serve the disenfranchised?Read more…

Listening to our colleagues: Muslim, secular, Christian. Interview with David Vishanoff

Too often we are so immersed in the tacit standards of our own discipline that we don’t stand back and try to reimagine them in radically Christian ways. Not jettison them and start over, but just notice how our standards and expectations embody and reinforce our sinful nature, and imagine how those particular sinful patterns and blind spots might be redeemed, right here in the specific department or conference or library where we find ourselves. It’s exhilarating, really, if we let our imaginations run wild a bit.Read more…

Sacrificial Listening (Scholar’s Compass)

David Vishanoff’s paper is a fascinating challenge to both Christian and secular academics to rethink the attitudes we have towards studying other cultures and worldviews. His model of ‘sacrificial listening’ has arisen from his study of Islam – as well as other world religions – and essentially consists in pursuing relationship rather than objectivity as an epistemological value.Read more…