ESN Devotional Has a Name

compass map photo

Thanks to everyone who commented for giving us so many great name ideas. We were impressed as always with the creativity and thoughtfulness of ESN members. We deeply appreciated your ideas, and may use some of them as theme ideas and titles within the devotional.

We’re also profoundly grateful for the response to the project so far. We’ve had nearly 50 people respond, and we’re delighted for each reply. If you haven’t responded, you can still fill out our survey, and we’d love to include you in the participants.

After discussing which names commenters recommended the most and weighing the metaphorical nuances of each one, ESN has found a name for the devotional: Scholar’s Compass.

As commenters and emailers noted, Scholar’s Compass is easily recognizable as related to the academic life, and it suggests the idea of charting a path and going on a journey, two themes that fit the goal of crafting devotionals about integrating faith and academic vocation.

We love the other ideas as well, and are working to find ways of integrating some of them into the devotional.

Please thank God with us as we celebrate such an exciting response to the project, and please pray for wisdom as we move into the next steps in the writing and editing process. Please continue to pray for deep and thoughtful community to come from this project, and join us in thanking God for the ways that is already starting to happen.

Thank you again for your participation, and stay tuned for more.

Photo by Lee Cannon (cc)

8/20/2014: Scholars’ Compass revised to Scholar’s Compass. More on the revision in a future post.

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Hannah Eagleson

Hannah Eagleson is a writer/editor on staff with InterVarsity’s Emerging Scholars Network (ESN). She edits ESN's collaboratively written devotional for academics. Hannah also crafts other community-building events and materials for ESN. She holds a PhD in English literature, and she’s working on a novel about a dragon who gave up fending off knights to become a tea importer in eighteenth-century England.

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