Seek the Welfare of the University (Jeremiah 29:7) — Donald Hay

Donald Hay[1] Seek the Welfare of the University (Jeremiah 29:7) (1/29/2012) from oxfordchristianmind (18 min, 17 sec).

Description: This lecture by prof. Donald Hay, given at the “Christianity and the Life of the Mind: An Introduction” conference on Jan 29, 2012, outlines the contours of a Christian engagement with the University.

Thank-you to John Mulholland, The Charles Malik Society for Redeeming Reason, for bringing to my attention Christianity and the Life of the Mind: An Introduction (Developing a Christian Mind at Oxford). As you may remember, I previously posted How Christians relate to the world — Nigel Biggar.

What is my interest in Developing a Christian Mind at Oxford and presentations such as this one offered by prof. Donald Hay? In publishing on topics such as academic vocation and calling, spiritual formation in the academy, and the integration of theology with academic disciplines, the Emerging Scholars Network (ESN) seeks to encourage, and equip the next generation of Christian scholars to be a redeeming influence in the academy, church, and the world.

In 2014 we are giving focused attention to the meaning/purpose of higher education and how this plays out not only across disciplines, but also “up and down” the “academic ladder”. Over the past week I have had a number of conversations exploring the importance of “the theology” of this task. By Fall 2014 we desire to have several pages on the “basics of theology in higher ed” developed for the resource section of the ESN website. This will draw from material first posted and then refined here on the blog. Stay tuned to learn more about these next stages of online conversation and resource development. In the mean time . . .

“Also, seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you into exile. Pray to the Lord for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper.” — Jeremiah 29:7 (NIV)


Notes

  1. Donald Hay was Fellow and Tutor in Economics at Jesus College from 1970 to 2000, and was then the first Head of the Division of Social Sciences in the University until 2005. He has researched in Brazil, China and the UK in the field of empirical industrial economics. Among his publications was an advanced textbook, Industrial Economics and Organisation  (OUP 1991), co-authored with Derek Morris. He has had a long term interest in the relationship between economic analysis and a Christian understanding of human society. He published Economics Today: A Christian Critique (Apollos and Eerdmans, 1989): more recently in this field he has worked on climate change, and the economics of marriage and divorce. He is a member of St Andrews church in North Oxford, and a Licensed Lay Minister. — From http://www.oxfordchristianmind.org/people/donald-hay/. Accessed 2/9/2014. ↩
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Tom Grosh IV

Enjoys daily conversations regarding living out the Biblical Story with his wife Theresa, four girls, around the block, at Elizabethtown Brethren in Christ Church (where he hosts the Christian Scholar Series), on campus as part of InterVarsity Graduate & Faculty Ministry (serving fellowships such as the Christian Medical Society/CMDA at Penn State College of Medicine), online as the Associate Director of the Emerging Scholars Network, in the culture at large, and in God's creation.

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3 Comments

  • mikstell@gmail.com'
    mikstelltheolog commented on February 10, 2014 Reply

    This video is great! Codifies much of my own thinking on Christians in academia, only with greater clarity and a British accent!

  • Tom Grosh IV commented on February 10, 2014 Reply

    Amen!

    Mike, Thank-you for not only sharing the good report on the above post, but also your contribution to the blog this morning (http://blog.emergingscholars.org/2014/02/teaching-religion-and-the-curriculum/). For more Developing a Christian Mind at Oxford videos, visit

    on the ESN FB Wall. I’ll include Louis’ video on the blog at some point :)

  • schunter@ymail.com'
    Steven commented on February 11, 2014 Reply

    This is a wonderful lecture, and Hunters book is a must read for anyone who hasn’t read it.

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